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Author Topic: Inspiration | Imitation | Plagiarism [slightly NSFW]  (Read 220188 times)
Suzanne
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« on: Nov 15, 2006, 18:30 »

This thread is all about the sources modern artists and photographers use as inspiration behind their works. After all, imitation is still the highest form of compliment - at least as long as it doesn't turn into plagiarism.

I'll start this thread with Alex Gross.


© Alex Gross: The Meaning, 2003/4

... inspired by...


© Hashiguchi Goyo: Woman Holding Lipstick, 1920
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Suzanne
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« Reply #1 on: Nov 24, 2006, 13:56 »

Here are two examples of imitation gone completely wrong. Only fashion photography can create such horrible analogies:


"The Blood Show" © Paco Peregrin

... inspired by...


"The Cloven Bunny" © Mark Ryden



"The Today Romantic" © Mario Sorrenti

... inspired by...


"Lady with an Ermine" by Leonardo da Vinci, ca. 1485
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naturalia
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« Reply #2 on: Dec 01, 2006, 07:40 »

Another Lady with Ermine for you and...



JOEL-PETER WITKIN, Gods of Earth and Heaven *

Botticelli, Birth of Venus

*oh crap...do I need to put a fig leaf on the Witkin?
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Suzanne
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« Reply #3 on: Dec 05, 2006, 21:49 »

Quote from: "naturalia"
*oh crap...do I need to put a fig leaf on the Witkin?


Hehe.. nah.. I'll just make the thread slightly NSFW.

Thanks for posting the x-ray lady! Great interpretation.

And now to another lady: The Lady of Shalott...


by John William Waterhouse


by Wim Bals
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« Reply #4 on: Dec 08, 2006, 02:03 »

Quote from: "naturalia"

*oh crap...do I need to put a fig leaf on the Witkin?


arh, c'mon... this is a european blog, we can handle it Wink

... and it's a fantastic picture!
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Suzanne
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« Reply #5 on: Dec 12, 2006, 14:19 »

One of my favourite maître de recyclage is of course Cedric Tanguy. Here are two interpretations by him:


© Jacques-Louis David: Napoleon Crossing the Alps (1801)


© Cedric Tanguy



© Jean Fouquet: Virgin and Child Surrounded by Angels (c.1450)


© Cedric Tanguy
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« Reply #6 on: Dec 13, 2006, 19:09 »

From the "Insult to Injury" etchings by Jake & Dinos Chapman, 2003 - based on Goya’s “Los Desastres de la Guerra” (1810–1820).

Sorry for the bad quality - I had to take the pictures through glass. Rolling Eyes


© Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes


© Chapman Brothers

* * * * *


© Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes


© Chapman Brothers

* * * * *


© Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes


© Chapman Brothers

* * * * *


© Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes


© Chapman Brothers
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« Reply #7 on: Dec 13, 2006, 23:22 »

I'm not quite sure about the "inspiration" for Ryden's and Bowers' Venus with Bunnies fascination, but I could imagine that it was one of Vecchio's pieces.


© David M. Bowers: Venus and the Rabbits


© Mark Ryden: Sophia's Mercurial Waters
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« Reply #8 on: Dec 15, 2006, 16:35 »

Ron English, for one, seems to be particularly fond of Édouard Manet's work...


© Édouard Manet


© Ron English

* * * * *


© Édouard Manet


© Ron English
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« Reply #9 on: Dec 17, 2006, 22:12 »

Max Ernst

Collette Calascione, Dream of the Hungry Ghost
http://www.calascione.com

Two brilliant images. I can't decide which I love more...
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« Reply #10 on: Dec 17, 2006, 22:44 »

Thank you soooooo much for adding these two beautiful pieces to our little collection, my dear.

Even though I'm an ardent Ernst groupie, I'd actually go for Colette's version. I mean the lady's dress just screams for wings. I also think she did an amazing job by breaking up the floor into burning trompe l'oeil sections. And strangely enough, I also felt that Ernst's door in the background was missing a handle and a keyhole, so I'm really glad that Colette took care of that too. I think Ernst would be very proud of her.

And for those of you who are still looking for a Christmas present: Ernst's "Une Semaine de Bonté" is a book that needs to be on every person's bookcase.
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« Reply #11 on: Jan 08, 2007, 15:28 »


© Mark Squires


© Mark Squires

... reminds me of/possibly inspired by...


© Théodore Géricault: The Raft of the Medusa, 1819
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« Reply #12 on: Jan 09, 2007, 00:51 »

Las Meninas by Diego Velasquez, 1656.



Las Meninas by Pablo Picasso



Las Meninas By Salvador Dali



Las Meninas By Joel Peter Witkins

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« Reply #13 on: Jan 09, 2007, 01:28 »

Great example!

À propos Velasquez: Folks who happen to be in London before Jan 21st should absolutely go and see the Velásquez exhibition at the National Gallery. It's stunning. gallery
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« Reply #14 on: Jan 16, 2007, 01:31 »

Arrow Why do we care about plagiarism? (article by Meghan O'Rourke for Slate Magazine)
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